Headache Spot Just Above The Temple

Your Pain Pattern,
What Aggravates It,

The Underlying Anatomy
How to Get Relief,
and more…


How People Describe This Pain Pattern

People complain of pain in their temple(s) but touch the spot just above the temple. It takes a little investigative work to nail the right trigger point.

At times this occurs by itself. Often, this headache pain occurs with other pain patterns. It can be hard to single out without specific questions. It occurs most often with the headache at the back of your head. This one compares most closely to the headache in the temple but notice that it is higher and without the neck and eye tension.

Most often, clients say that they got it from “sleeping wrong.” They’ll complain about a click or pop in the top of their neck that started the headache. I’ve had that happen to me while reading in bed before sleep. I’ll get a little click with a light headache and then wake with a dull headache in the morning.



How You Activate and Intensify This Pain Pattern

Most often, clients say that they got it from “sleeping wrong.” They’ll complain about a click or pop in the top of their neck that started the headache. I’ve had that happen to me while reading in bed before sleep. I’ll get a little click with a light headache and then wake with a dull headache in the morning.

At times, they can pinpoint laying on their back with the base of their head laying on a hard surface before the headache started. This can start the headache pattern, especially if the surface was cold and the muscle was chilled, compressed and twisted while laying there.

This is also a problem. There are several muscles that get aggravated by jutting the chin forward and resting it on your hand. You’ll see it in several posts. It is worse when you use your hand to support the weight of your head. That really wedges the top vertebra out of place.


The Musculoskeletal Anatomy Behind Your Pain

Effective relief starts with an understanding of the anatomy.
About the coloring of the illustrations…

This muscle is part of intrinsic back muscles that stabilize the vertebrae and cranium. Read more about it in this post n semispinalis capitis.



Getting Relief on Your Own

Clinically Proven
Self-Care Recommendations.

This post has strategies for getting relief on your own. Explore how to change your activities, stretch and other strategies that relieve the pain associated with this trigger point.


Treatment Notes for Therapists

Better Bodywork
Through Shared Expertise.

This post has techniques, tips, treatment routines, and anatomy illustrations to improve the bodyworker’s approach.



This site is undergoing changes. Starting in early 2020, we began changing the format of the posts to include more extensive self-care, illustrations, therapist notes, anatomy, and protocols. We’d love your feedback. We are adding posts and converting the old posts as quickly as time permits.


Weekly Featured Post

Pain relief that is
quicker and more effective
than traditional stretching.

This post covers the basics of Ice-and-Stretch, a tool that is used extensively in these posts combined with Active Isolated Stretching and Yoga poses.

Tony Preston has a practice in Atlanta, Georgia where he sees clients. He has written and taught about anatomy, trigger points, and cranial therapies since the mid-90s.

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*This site is undergoing major changes. We are reformatting and expanding the posts to make it easier to read, more accessible, and
to include more patterns with better self-care. In the meanwhile, there will be inconsistency in formatting, content, and readability until we get the old posts updated. Please excuse our mess.